Mysterious Moscow-based producer Gesloten Cirkel, who has hidden his identity since releasing his first EP in 2009, will release his debut album Submit X next month on Murder Capital, the same label through which he dropped his memorable maiden self-titled EP. Gesloten Cirkel’s output has been limited since then – a case of quality over quantity if ever there was one – with his discography currently comprising just three EPs, the most recent being last year’s Hole, which featured a remix from Nonplus main man Boddika under his esoteric electro-leaning Transportation AAD moniker. Each of Gesloten Cirkel’s releases have received a strong response from the club cognoscenti, a trend he established with his debut EP, which was heavily supported by the likes of Levon Vincent and piqued my interest with the self-titled track ‘Gesloten Cirkel’ – a rollicking fusion of crackling house and robust death disco crowned by a rooster sample that doubles as a delectable call-to-arms for a dancefloor circa dawn. As one YouTube user astutely commented, “This is the music playing at the party you want to be at”. I firmly endorse such comments, and certainly regret not playing ‘Gesloten Cirkel’ out in DJ sets in all its crowing glory when I had the opportunity to do so – one of life’s many ‘should’ves, would’ves, could’ves’. 

  

 

Details about the forthcoming Submit X album are scarce aside from the fact it comprises ten tracks and a description/warning that it is “not for the faint-hearted”. What else would you expect from a producer who shuns the fame game and hasn’t even revealed his identity to the world? “I hope it isn’t intentional because that seems like a dick thing to do,” the anonymous producer responded via email when pressed about his penchant for withholding information from the public sphere. “For the record, I am just an out of shape balding dude who sits in an office,” he confirmed, before adding facetiously “OR AM I?!!!… Loose lips sink ships.” Despite his limited output and abrasively underground approach to PR, Gesloten Cirkel has built up a strong cult following, performing at the nightclub pantheon Berghain and having his tracks rinsed by the likes of Ben UFO, Boddika, Blawan and, of course, Levon Vincent. Anyone with a penchant for “rave music and dark stuff”, or quality house and neo-techno for that matter, should snap up Submit X when it drops in April. 

 

Enjoy a podcast of the man himself here.

 

House music auteur Fred Peterkin, known to dancers and chin-strokers alike for his output as Fred P and Black Jazz Consortium, will headline the next Mad Racket on Saturday April 26. Hailing from Queens, and having honed his DJ skills around the NYC club circuit, Peterkin’s sound traverses everything from soulful house influences to tougher techno beats. His accomplished body of work as Fred P and Black Jazz Consortium has been released largely on his own Soul People Music imprint, though Peterkin has also collaborated with Move D and co-released with Vakula on Ethereal Sound, in addition to releasing on Jus-Ed’s Underground Quality label. More recently, Peterkin kicked off a new series on his Boards label with an unmixed compilation of tracks from the likes of Ryo Murakami that is descriptively entitled Selected: Compiled By Fred P

 

 

Next month, Austrian proponent of experimental electronica Christian Fennesz will release his first album in six years, BОcs. Since starting out as a singer and guitarist in Viennese underground band Maische during the late ’80s – come on, you’re a huge fan of Maische, right? – Fennesz has established himself as an ambient producer of note, while attracting a broad listening public through his diverse body of remixes that includes refashionings of Junior Boys, Nine Inch Nails and Oneohtrix Point Never. Despite the substantial gap between BОcs and Fennesz’s last full solo LP, 2008’s Black Sea, our subject has actually been quite prolific in recent years. For instance, he put outan ultra-limited edition cassette-only release called Szampler for the UK Tapeworm imprint in 2010, and was the driving force behind the soundtrack for Edgar HonetschlКger’s 2011 film The Beginning And The End Of All Things the following year. The forthcoming BОcs is touted as a “conceptual follow up” to Fennesz’s lauded 2001 album Endless Summer. In contrast to the drone-driven soundscapes of Fennesz’s last album, BОcs apparently explores “more florid pop mechanisms” throughout its seven tracks, a forecast that provides an uplifting note for us to close this week’s column on [fade to black, as florid pop plays over the end titles…]

 

 

LOOKING DEEPER

 

Saturday
March 15

88uw and Krenzlin

Warehouse party

Moritz Von Oswald

The Burdekin

 

Saturday
March 22

Recondite

Club 77

 

Saturday April 26

Fred P

Marrickville Bowling Club

 

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