h

Film

Posted 30 May 2013 @ 9:50am

The heart, “the most insolent muscle of the whole anatomy”, proves an impossible beast to tame in Portuguese director Miguel Gomes’ tale of love lost, Tabu.

 

Winner of the Silver Bear at the 62nd Berlin International Film Festival last year, Tabu is a love story told in two parts, revitalising every trick in the early Western cinema book.

 

Bouncing from a dull...

Posted 28 May 2013 @ 6:18pm

You may not have seen Baz Luhrmann’s The Great Gatsby just yet, but you probably already have a pretty firm opinion about it. 

 

In fact, it’s likely you fall in one of two camps: The Great Gatsby is a dynamic and visually-spectacular masterpiece from a visionary director, or The Great Gatsby is a gaudy travesty that lays waste to one of the 20th century’s greatest novels. That’s...

Posted 21 May 2013 @ 1:02pm

Where Blue Valentine was epic in its intimacy, turning a macro lens on one relationship from go to woe, Derek Cianfrance’s follow up is epic in perspective, spanning two generations of two families and their intertwined fates, with grand themes of sons and fathers, loss and forgiveness. And it’s as ambitious in style as it is in content, compounding the eerie gothic horror of David Lynch with...

Posted 16 May 2013 @ 11:31am

Have you ever sat through a dinner party with perfectly pleasant but perfectly dull guests? That’s like sitting through Haute Cuisine. It’s not offensive, but you secretly wish you’d drunk a bit more wine before you arrived.

 

Haute Cuisine tells the story of Hortense Laborie (Catherine Frot), a Périgord local renowned for her exemplary yet simple French cooking. Unexpectedly...

Posted 16 May 2013 @ 10:49am

For all its marketing collateral, Snitch appears to be your token action flick; Rock-hard frontman, guns-a-blazing to the cries of Sons-In-Distress. But ignore that burning semi-trailer on the poster – this film, created by a former stuntman, offers a surprisingly well-made, well-acted and well-written look into the US federal sentencing system. And it stars Dwayne Johnson. Win.

 

...
Posted 15 May 2013 @ 8:41am

Until recently, Harmony Korine has been the underdog of a fiercely independent film-as-provocation subculture of American cinema, along with filmmakers like Vincent Gallo and Larry Clark. A skater, painter, author and photographer, his films have been decidedly on the experimental and performance art end of the spectrum – apart perhaps, from the very verité Kids, which he wrote when he was 19...

Posted 14 May 2013 @ 7:08pm

The most impressive thing about actor Ryan Gosling is not his dreamy blue eyes, or the internet memes he has spawned; it’s the way he switches effortlessly from high budget romances to small, gritty independent movies, refusing to rest on his good looks, constantly surprising audiences at every turn.

 

In 2010 Gosling won acclaim for his emotional role in Derek Cianfrance’s low...

Posted 14 May 2013 @ 7:03pm

Broken, the debut feature film from British theatre director Rufus Norris, is a story of fear and paranoia in the suburbs. The protagonist of the story is a strong-willed young girl named Skunk, and it was the depth of this character that drew Norris to the project. “I think that for me and for most storytellers, the way into any story has to be personal,” he says. “I have two young children,...

Posted 14 May 2013 @ 6:54pm

Will 2013 see a film harder to sell than Miguel Gomes’ quietly brilliant Tabu? Shot in black and white in the same squarish 1:37:1 aspect ratio that in recent years has framed both Andrea Arnold’s revisionist Wuthering Heights and Kelly Reichardt’s laconic feminist western Meek’s Cutoff, Tabu is in summary a difficult film to endear to non-boffin contemporary viewers. Quite apart from the...

Pages