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Arts Features

Posted 28 May 2013 @ 6:25pm

While 3D printing may exist primarily in the realm of cool things you’ve read about on the internet, the technology is rapidly spreading, and its potential applications are far-reaching. 

 

The scale stretches from small to vast – scientists at Princeton have just used bio-organic printing to create a working human ear, while Dutch architects are presently working on a 3D printed...

Posted 28 May 2013 @ 6:21pm

Tony Kushner’s Angels In America may be the defining American play of the 20th century.

 

An epic and sprawling work, it takes on the AIDS crisis, and through this, expands into philosophical questions about the nature of life itself. At seven hours across two parts, it’s also one of the biggest and most ambitious plays you could attempt. Belvoir Street Theatre regular Eamon...

Posted 28 May 2013 @ 6:18pm

You may not have seen Baz Luhrmann’s The Great Gatsby just yet, but you probably already have a pretty firm opinion about it. 

 

In fact, it’s likely you fall in one of two camps: The Great Gatsby is a dynamic and visually-spectacular masterpiece from a visionary director, or The Great Gatsby is a gaudy travesty that lays waste to one of the 20th century’s greatest novels. That’s...

Posted 23 May 2013 @ 5:46pm

“I’ve got a first edition of The Waste Land, which I adore. I’ve got this old edition, published by Olympia Press by Henry Miller, Tropic of Cancer… I love Under Milk Wood. I love Nancy Mitford. I love Couplesby John Updike.”

 

Jemma Birrell is the most active bookworm you’ve ever met. She swooned over limited editions when working for a Parisian publishing house. She managed to...

Posted 23 May 2013 @ 5:42pm

Andrew Johnstone and Murray Bell just want to help.

 

Ready to kick off their 11th year of the Semi-Permanent (SP) design conference in Sydney, the co-founders have been connecting creatives, inspiring artists and celebrating new work across the globe every year since 2003. All you have to do is bring a pen, pad and a shitload of business cards.

 

After 11 years of...

Posted 23 May 2013 @ 5:37pm

Some ten years ago, the Head On Portrait Prize had its inaugural showing, a relatively small event designed to give lesser-known photographers a look in to the competitive circuit via its unique blind judging process. 

 

By 2008, this modest prize had become the Head On Foundation, a not-for-profit devoted to consciousness-raising through photography. In 2010, the whole shebang...

Posted 23 May 2013 @ 5:33pm

The nineteenth Symposium on Electronic Art hits Sydney next month with a program of exhibitions, performances and panel discussions to enlighten audiences on the practice, significance and influence of electronic media arts.

 

The 19th Symposium on Electronic Art hits Sydney next month with a program of exhibitions, performances and panel discussions to enlighten audiences on the...

Posted 23 May 2013 @ 5:17pm

Melbourne performer Jon Bennett believes in the power of the phallus like no other. 

 

As the star of his show, Pretending Things Are A Cock, it’s taken him around the world from the Amazon to the Edinburgh Fringe – all the while pursuing the simple concept of, well, snapping photos of imaginary penises. “Anything can be a pretend cock,” Bennett says, “as long as you believe.”...

Posted 23 May 2013 @ 5:12pm

Comedian Margaret Cho was born and raised in San Francisco, and from childhood, was exposed in the queer culture of the city. 

 

As a grown woman, she still grapples with questions of identity – as an individual, as a member of a community – and her new show draws directly on these thoughts. Entitled Mother, it sees Cho grappling with the idea of parenthood as it relates to queer...

Posted 23 May 2013 @ 5:08pm

Henry Phillips has the funniest material you’ve never heard. 

 

In fact, it’s quite likely you’ve never even seen the American comic’s name before, much less heard his twisted and hilarious songs. But the New Jersey native is relatively okay with the slow burn of his career thus far. “I’m doing fine right now,” he says. “I mean, I’m kind of frustrated to hear about what’s going...

Posted 23 May 2013 @ 5:01pm

Paul Foot is a man prone to overthinking things. 

 

As our interview commences, I ask the UK comedian how he’s enjoying his trip to Australia so far. Most would treat a question like this as idle chatter, but he considers his answer for a good long while. “I’m about five-eighths of the way through my trip, or maybe seven-elevenths, and it’s going very nicely thank you,” he says...

Posted 15 May 2013 @ 8:41am

Until recently, Harmony Korine has been the underdog of a fiercely independent film-as-provocation subculture of American cinema, along with filmmakers like Vincent Gallo and Larry Clark. A skater, painter, author and photographer, his films have been decidedly on the experimental and performance art end of the spectrum – apart perhaps, from the very verité Kids, which he wrote when he was 19...

Posted 14 May 2013 @ 7:08pm

The most impressive thing about actor Ryan Gosling is not his dreamy blue eyes, or the internet memes he has spawned; it’s the way he switches effortlessly from high budget romances to small, gritty independent movies, refusing to rest on his good looks, constantly surprising audiences at every turn.

 

In 2010 Gosling won acclaim for his emotional role in Derek Cianfrance’s low...

Posted 14 May 2013 @ 7:03pm

Broken, the debut feature film from British theatre director Rufus Norris, is a story of fear and paranoia in the suburbs. The protagonist of the story is a strong-willed young girl named Skunk, and it was the depth of this character that drew Norris to the project. “I think that for me and for most storytellers, the way into any story has to be personal,” he says. “I have two young children,...

Posted 14 May 2013 @ 6:54pm

Will 2013 see a film harder to sell than Miguel Gomes’ quietly brilliant Tabu? Shot in black and white in the same squarish 1:37:1 aspect ratio that in recent years has framed both Andrea Arnold’s revisionist Wuthering Heights and Kelly Reichardt’s laconic feminist western Meek’s Cutoff, Tabu is in summary a difficult film to endear to non-boffin contemporary viewers. Quite apart from the...

Posted 14 May 2013 @ 6:48pm

Reportage Photography Festival is packing quite a few surprises in its 11th season. The documentary photography festival will premiere at Vivid Sydney, and show works across a range of platforms including exhibitions, outdoor projections, workshops and discussions.

 

Special guests at the festival include American husband and wife photographers Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb,...

Posted 14 May 2013 @ 6:40pm

As a founding editor of Lucky Peach magazine, Chris Ying is an independent publishing success story who’s presenting Indie Magazines: High End Content, Low End Budgets as part of this year’s Vivid Ideas program. You may have a subscription to Lucky Peach yourself, or have seen it in the kitchen of a hipster friend, but if not, then all you need to know is that it’s a new generation of cooking...

Posted 14 May 2013 @ 5:53pm

Sometimes, it’s tricky being a creative person. You may have a brilliant idea – for a movie, a magazine, a business or any of a million other things – but no idea how to turn that idea into a reality. The Vivid Ideas festival, running in tandem with Vivid Live, is all about helping creative people achieve their goals. It’s about the work that goes into creativity, and about building a...

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