Just a bunch of cracker Australian films on streaming services right now, from ballistic crime capers to sumptuous outback romances.

Storm Boy (1976) dir. Henri Safran

Streaming now on SBS on Demand

Who could forget Dear Mr. Percival. Sometimes the films that move us most profoundly as adults are childhood classics. Henri Safran’s coming-of-age story of a boy and his pet pelican is timeless. The film is worth revisiting for the exquisite outfits alone. I can’t wait until we free ourselves from the hold of the ironic mullet and start donning the chic 70s’ blunt scissor shag.

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Babe: Pig in the City  (1998) dir. George Miller

Streaming now on Stan

The second greatest sequel of all time (ousted by only the untouchable Paddington 2.) Get this… It’s a pig… but he’s in the city.

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The Piano (1993) dir. Jane Campion

Watch on Stan

This list will feature three Jane Campion films. If you think that it’s excessive just know that you’re incorrect and it’s actually a display of radical self-control. Campion is a god amongst mortals. Her films touch some unknown, melancholy place. A weird, brooding, feminine darkness. UGHHHHHHH. So glorious.

The Piano is the best place to start on your Campion journey, it’s her most accessible (and most heartwrenching.) Campion became the first female director to win the Cannes’ Palme d’Or for her delicate drama about a love triangle and a piano player, set on the misty sumptuous shores of Aotearoa.

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An Angel At My Table (1990) dir. Jane Campion

Watch on Netflix

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again (and again) (and again), no one brings poetry to the screen better than Campion. There’s no hokey beatnik cosplay here. You won’t be seeing a floppy-haired heartthrob donning Bailey Nelson-style specs. An Angel At My Table is Campion’s first poet biopic.

Based on the autobiography of the same name, retells the life of Janet Frame, New Zealand’s most celebrated author, through three different stages in her miraculous life. From her impoverished, tragedy-laden childhood, to her teenage years and schizophrenia misdiagnosis and finally, to her literary reverence. It’s sublime.

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Bright Star (2009) dir. Jane Campion

Watch on Youtube

The last of the Campion triple bill, bear with me. Bright Star is a paen of the doomed love affair of poet John Keats’s and Fanny Brawne. Fucking hell it is pure romance. I seriously deserve to lay slovenly in a field of wildflowers, draped in layers-upon layers of linen whilst donning a whimple or whatever they wore back then. Cottagecore heaven.

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Shine (1996) dir. Scott Hicks 

Watch on Netflix

Is Geoffrey Rush cancelled? I can’t remember. This isn’t a lesson on moral posturing, this is a list of movie recommendations. Also, Noah Taylor blew the pants off him performance-wise. Scott Hicks’ biopic on prodigious Australian pianist David Helfgott is quite simply, extraordinary. Perhaps one of the best films to feature a scene where an adult shits in the bathtub.

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Two Hands (1999) dir. Gregor Jordan

Watch on Netflix

Everything about Two Hands is cool. The film that made me fall in love with Australian cinema. Led by gorgeous, warm performances from young Heath Ledger and Rose Byrne and a litany of other oddball characters. God, I love this movie so much. The greatest. Also soundtracking the film’s climax with ‘These Days’ by Powderfinger… transcendental. Give em’ ya fucking keys!

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Evil Angels (1998) dir. Fred Schepisi

Watch on Netflix

The dingo’s got my baby! Lindy Chamberlain-Creighton’s high-profile murder case still haunts. Chamberlain served three years in prison following the disappearance of her nine-month-old daughter Azaria from a camping ground near Uluru. Schepisi’s dramatisation is a magnificent feat.

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The Chant of Jimmy Blacksmith (1978) dir. Fred Schepisi 

Watch on Netflix

The Chant of Jimmy Blacksmith is a staple in the Australian New Wave. Set against the sprawling, raw Australian outback in the 1900s, the film is based on the Indigenous Australian outlaw Jimmy Governor. Who, in the film, goes on a murder spree against whites.

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Samson and Delilah (2009) dir. Warwick Burton

Watch on Stan

Warwick Thornton’s masterpiece will have you feeling it all. A delicate balance of humour, drama, and deep affection for an Australia unknown to most of us. Samson and Delilah is a love story between two people who live off the map in an Indigenous community near Alice Springs.

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Somersault (2004) dir. Cate Shortland

Watch on Youtube

Led by baby-faced performances from Abby Cornish and Sam Worthington, Somersault is a beautiful, lonely story of a 16-year-old runaway who flees to Jindabyne. It’s light and special, perfectly soundtracked by Melbourne’s The Decoder Ring.

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The Jammed

Watch on Stan

Dee McLachlan’s 2007 thriller is a bleak story of Melbourne sex slaves at risk of government deportation is an Australian indie essential. A low-budget, grimy exploration of the Australian underworld that continues to grip out our psyche.

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Proof (1991) dir. Jocelyn Moorhouse

Watch on Stan

I’m waiting for all the haters and losers to realise that Russell Crowe actually rocks. I’m not condoning his violent run-ins or A Beautiful Mind, but ol’ Rusty has charisma. The Proof is in the pudding. Hugo Weaving is absolutely fucking excellent as a blind, jaded and distrustful photographer.